New! on nikkistyle.net: Allure Magazine’s 2012 Beauty Blogger of the Year - Read my Q & A with the winner, Shannon of Gloss + Dirt Blog…
Click! Click! Click!

New! on nikkistyle.net: Allure Magazine’s 2012 Beauty Blogger of the Year - Read my Q & A with the winner, Shannon of Gloss + Dirt Blog…

Click! Click! Click!

Rihanna Covers Elle [US], May 2012
On her breakup with Chris Brown:  “It gave me guns. I was like, well, fuck. They know more about me than I want them to know. It’s embarrassing. But that was my opening. That was my liberation, my moment of bring it. […] Now you know that, so you can say what you want about it. I don’t have anything to hide.”
On the backlash over their reconciliation:  “The bottom line is that everyone thinks differently. It’s very hard for me to accept, but I get it. People end up wasting their time on the blogs or whatever, ranting away, and that’s all right. Because tomorrow I’m still going to be the same person. I’m still going to do what I want to do.”
The May issue will be on newsstands April 17!

Rihanna Covers Elle [US], May 2012

On her breakup with Chris Brown:  “It gave me guns. I was like, well, fuck. They know more about me than I want them to know. It’s embarrassing. But that was my opening. That was my liberation, my moment of bring it. […] Now you know that, so you can say what you want about it. I don’t have anything to hide.”
On the backlash over their reconciliation:  “The bottom line is that everyone thinks differently. It’s very hard for me to accept, but I get it. People end up wasting their time on the blogs or whatever, ranting away, and that’s all right. Because tomorrow I’m still going to be the same person. I’m still going to do what I want to do.”

The May issue will be on newsstands April 17!

The Breakfast Club (NY) Interviews Nicki Minaj.

Jessica Biel Covers ‘W’ April 2012
What’s the first movie you remember seeing? 
The Goonies. I never identified with girls, and the cast was all boys. Girls were nervous about going into caves; they were scaredy-cats—and I wasn’t into that at all. I loved the idea of being with a crew and having an adventure. I was really interested in pits full of snakes.
Were you raised to be sort of anti-girly? Somewhat. 
We lived in Colorado, and my parents were outdoorsy mountain people. My father would always say, “Go out and don’t come back until you have something to show me.” Which meant he wanted me to come back with a scraped knee or an injury. When I went out to play, I felt like I’d better get hurt.
Did you have Barbies? 
I did, but it was always, “Let’s play sex with Barbies!” My Barbies were usually naked. Once, I took their heads off, cut their hair, drew on their short, spiky hair with some markers, then stuck the heads on Christmas lights. Every year, we’d string our tree with those Barbie heads. It looked demonic. My parents were so cool—they saw it as a form of self-expression.
You began acting when you were very young. How did you get started? 
When I was 11, I was in a competition sponsored by the International Modeling and Talent Association. You paid a certain amount of money and they taught you to walk a runway, present a comedic monologue, a dramatic monologue, a dance routine, and a song. My runway look was a one-piece bathing suit, a top hat, and a bow tie. The competition was in L.A., and afterward I got a manager and an agent. I tried out for a billion things, and after three years, I was cast on the show 7th Heaven.
That television series, which ran for 11 years, was known for its wholesome, all-American, quasi-­religious message. The parents were literally and figuratively blond and blue-eyed. It always seemed to me that, physically, you looked like you belonged in another family.
Looking back I can see that, but at the time I literally didn’t care if I was the wrong race or wrong gender; I wanted that part. I wanted any part. And that show was fun. I was a basketball player who was going through all the stuff that a 14-year-old goes through, which is, as you know, completely psychotic.
Did you rebel in your teens? 
I cut my hair supershort and dyed it blonde. I had to apologize to Aaron Spelling [the producer] for doing that. He wasn’t happy. When I turned 17 or 18, a really obnoxious friend sent a stripper to the set. I had to apologize for that too. The show was all about family values, and they took that position seriously. I was always apologizing. Read more.

Jessica Biel Covers ‘W’ April 2012

What’s the first movie you remember seeing?
The Goonies. I never identified with girls, and the cast was all boys. Girls were nervous about going into caves; they were scaredy-cats—and I wasn’t into that at all. I loved the idea of being with a crew and having an adventure. I was really interested in pits full of snakes.
Were you raised to be sort of anti-girly? Somewhat.
We lived in Colorado, and my parents were outdoorsy mountain people. My father would always say, “Go out and don’t come back until you have something to show me.” Which meant he wanted me to come back with a scraped knee or an injury. When I went out to play, I felt like I’d better get hurt.
Did you have Barbies?
I did, but it was always, “Let’s play sex with Barbies!” My Barbies were usually naked. Once, I took their heads off, cut their hair, drew on their short, spiky hair with some markers, then stuck the heads on Christmas lights. Every year, we’d string our tree with those Barbie heads. It looked demonic. My parents were so cool—they saw it as a form of self-expression.
You began acting when you were very young. How did you get started?
When I was 11, I was in a competition sponsored by the International Modeling and Talent Association. You paid a certain amount of money and they taught you to walk a runway, present a comedic monologue, a dramatic monologue, a dance routine, and a song. My runway look was a one-piece bathing suit, a top hat, and a bow tie. The competition was in L.A., and afterward I got a manager and an agent. I tried out for a billion things, and after three years, I was cast on the show 7th Heaven.
That television series, which ran for 11 years, was known for its wholesome, all-American, quasi-­religious message. The parents were literally and figuratively blond and blue-eyed. It always seemed to me that, physically, you looked like you belonged in another family.
Looking back I can see that, but at the time I literally didn’t care if I was the wrong race or wrong gender; I wanted that part. I wanted any part. And that show was fun. I was a basketball player who was going through all the stuff that a 14-year-old goes through, which is, as you know, completely psychotic.
Did you rebel in your teens?
I cut my hair supershort and dyed it blonde. I had to apologize to Aaron Spelling [the producer] for doing that. He wasn’t happy. When I turned 17 or 18, a really obnoxious friend sent a stripper to the set. I had to apologize for that too. The show was all about family values, and they took that position seriously. I was always apologizing. Read more.
Making Major Moves.
In addition to her upcoming marriage to fiancé Chad Ochocinco, Evelyn Lozada has other endeavors in the pipeline, such as a book deal, a makeup line, making maxi dresses, and much more. 
Lozada Chats with Vh1 About Future Plans:
Can you talk about some of the business ventures you’re working on these days?
I have my book deal, I’m doing a makeup line. Because of the show, so many people were interested in my makeup. I have a vodka deal, I’m going to start making maxi dresses, they’re going to be affordable, nothing too high end, but I want viewers to feel like they’re a part of Evelyn and the show. Me and my girlfriend Theresa, she’s Bow Wow‘s mother, we’re going to design them. She has a really good sense of style and I believe in her. But it takes some time.
Maxi dresses are so Basketball Wives, it makes sense that someone’s selling them, finally.
Yeah, I think a lot of the ladies, if you do watch the show, you do want to find cute maxi dresses, especially in Florida, they’re everywhere.

Making Major Moves.

In addition to her upcoming marriage to fiancé Chad Ochocinco, Evelyn Lozada has other endeavors in the pipeline, such as a book deal, a makeup line, making maxi dresses, and much more. 

Lozada Chats with Vh1 About Future Plans:

Can you talk about some of the business ventures you’re working on these days?
I have my book deal, I’m doing a makeup line. Because of the show, so many people were interested in my makeup. I have a vodka deal, I’m going to start making maxi dresses, they’re going to be affordable, nothing too high end, but I want viewers to feel like they’re a part of Evelyn and the show. Me and my girlfriend Theresa, she’s Bow Wow‘s mother, we’re going to design them. She has a really good sense of style and I believe in her. But it takes some time.
Maxi dresses are so Basketball Wives, it makes sense that someone’s selling them, finally.
Yeah, I think a lot of the ladies, if you do watch the show, you do want to find cute maxi dresses, especially in Florida, they’re everywhere.
Nicki Minaj Covers New York Magazine
"The Spring Fashion" Issue
A conversation with Minaj.
So is it safe to assume that you were always interested in fashion?
I’ve always been intrigued by color and by interesting hair. I was one of those weird little girls doing my own hair at the age of 9. I was, like, getting weird gels and new brushes and cornrow holders. I would tweak and perm at the age of 13. When I first went to get my hair colored, I was about 14 and I wanted blonde highlights. The beautician said, “No, you have to get your mother on the phone,” and I was just crying and begging. I’ve always been experimenting. Cyndi Lauper’s videos—that’s what intrigued me.
And you definitely use your looks to get noticed.
I like the idea of doing something that everyone else is not. I get high off that. Just the idea that other people don’t have the balls to do something—that’s my thing.
You were at a lot of fashion shows last season. 
The biggest surprise to me was that after I went to some shows with Anna Wintour, I got an autographed photo from her the next day that said, “We match!” I had on these, like, weird balls and craziness, and she had on this really sophisticated dress, but they both were orange. I was like, “Oh my God, I’m getting this framed!” I’m going to get a bigger version and put it in my gym, because that’s some fly motivation.
What’s the story with your different alter egos?
I have different personalities, so I just started naming them. Like, there’s one that’s angry, a little more in-your-face. I named that person Roman. He guest stars on my new album. There’s also his mother, Martha. She guest-stars as well. She’s from London. I also have a Barbie character that comes out every now and then. She’s soft-spoken, really sweet, and polite. She’s got a kid’s voice.
Do you dress for your different personalities?
If I’m more dressed down in sweats and black hair, that’s the Nicki character. Roman is more outlandish with his dress code—he’ll wear speakers on his butt and stuff like that. Barbie wears little cute dresses that don’t show too much skin.
Are you coming back to Fashion Week this time?
I’m not impressed to be in that world. I’m in my own world. I think sometimes the fashion world isn’t even about clothes anymore; it’s about this “in” crowd, and I’m not into that. But I’m doing a Barbie fashion show. They did a Barbie for me, and that is super friggin’ amazing.

Nicki Minaj Covers New York Magazine

"The Spring Fashion" Issue

A conversation with Minaj.

So is it safe to assume that you were always interested in fashion?
I’ve always been intrigued by color and by interesting hair. I was one of those weird little girls doing my own hair at the age of 9. I was, like, getting weird gels and new brushes and cornrow holders. I would tweak and perm at the age of 13. When I first went to get my hair colored, I was about 14 and I wanted blonde highlights. The beautician said, “No, you have to get your mother on the phone,” and I was just crying and begging. I’ve always been experimenting. Cyndi Lauper’s videos—that’s what intrigued me.
And you definitely use your looks to get noticed.
I like the idea of doing something that everyone else is not. I get high off that. Just the idea that other people don’t have the balls to do something—that’s my thing.
You were at a lot of fashion shows last season.
The biggest surprise to me was that after I went to some shows with Anna Wintour, I got an autographed photo from her the next day that said, “We match!” I had on these, like, weird balls and craziness, and she had on this really sophisticated dress, but they both were orange. I was like, “Oh my God, I’m getting this framed!” I’m going to get a bigger version and put it in my gym, because that’s some fly motivation.
What’s the story with your different alter egos?
I have different personalities, so I just started naming them. Like, there’s one that’s angry, a little more in-your-face. I named that person Roman. He guest stars on my new album. There’s also his mother, Martha. She guest-stars as well. She’s from London. I also have a Barbie character that comes out every now and then. She’s soft-spoken, really sweet, and polite. She’s got a kid’s voice.
Do you dress for your different personalities?
If I’m more dressed down in sweats and black hair, that’s the Nicki character. Roman is more outlandish with his dress code—he’ll wear speakers on his butt and stuff like that. Barbie wears little cute dresses that don’t show too much skin.
Are you coming back to Fashion Week this time?
I’m not impressed to be in that world. I’m in my own world. I think sometimes the fashion world isn’t even about clothes anymore; it’s about this “in” crowd, and I’m not into that. But I’m doing a Barbie fashion show. They did a Barbie for me, and that is super friggin’ amazing.
Singer-Songwriter, Adele Covers Vogue [US], March 2012
Get The Look: Adele’s Old World Beauty 
“I am quite loud and bolshie,” she says (British slang for unruly and clamorous). “I’m a big personality. I walk into a room, big and tall and loud.” Indeed. There is no doubt when Adele is in the building. The rule of thumb for protecting one’s vocal cords, she tells me, is: If people are more than an arm’s length away, you shouldn’t talk to them. “But I am like, Wah! Wah! Wah!,” she says, laughing. “It’s really bad.”

Singer-Songwriter, Adele Covers Vogue [US], March 2012

Get The Look: Adele’s Old World Beauty

“I am quite loud and bolshie,” she says (British slang for unruly and clamorous). “I’m a big personality. I walk into a room, big and tall and loud.” Indeed. There is no doubt when Adele is in the building. The rule of thumb for protecting one’s vocal cords, she tells me, is: If people are more than an arm’s length away, you shouldn’t talk to them. “But I am like, Wah! Wah! Wah!,” she says, laughing. “It’s really bad.”
honeymag:

The dictionary describes an entrepreneur as ‘A person who engages in business enterprise, usually with some personal financial risk.’
Under this definition, anyone who runs and owns his or her own business can be classified as an entrepreneur because they are taking a risk with their finances every day. But what are the qualities of a successful entrepreneur? Simply owning a business and having risks doesn’t mean that you have successfully accomplished your goal. The dictionary only scratches the surface of what it takes to be an entrepreneur in today’s competitive business world. One must also take into account an individual’s personality, actions and behavioral patterns—which all contribute to a person’s ability to earn the title of a ‘successful entrepreneur.’
Although it may seem easy enough, becoming a successful entrepreneur is not rudimentary. You have to have a product or service that consumers really want, an organized form of sales and service, and quality marketing advertising. For many of us, the journey to earning the title begins with a burst of excitement about turning our passion into a business (followed by flashing lights of the word “success”). The experience of getting a new idea is wonderful, what follows can be the most exciting and emotional journey you will ever experience. But there is a long, hard road you must travel to take your idea from conception to reality.
I’ve been there. I traveled this road many times, I have had my share of light bulb moments, and I have learned some key points along the way that make the difference between a dreamer and a successful entrepreneur. I learned the old-fashioned way—trial and failure. But, for all my failures came a triumph that made every misstep more than worth it. Here are some helpful tips on how to avoid some of those mistakes I made, and that you take with you on your entrepreneurial adventure.
Dream big: To achieve the kind of success that you want, you need to dream big. Every success story starts with big dreams. Have a clear and concise vision of what you want and where you want your idea to go. Actively visualize success in your mind so that it actually starts to become reality. Speak it into existence! Be the person now that you imagine yourself being when you reach your goal. Dress the part now, speak the language now, talk about the places your business will allow you to travel to, research them, tell your friends and family what’s going to happen. The more you speak, the more you’ll believe and the more inclined you’ll be to make things happen. People may look at you like you’re crazy, but imagine how they looked at the Wright brother’s when they thought of creating the first successful aircraft.
Be a leader. Leadership is one of the areas that many entrepreneurs tend to overlook, according to leadership coach John C. Maxwell, whose books include The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership (Thomas Nelson, 1998) and Developing the Leader Within You (Thomas Nelson, 1993). Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “A good leader inspires people to have confidence in the leader, a great leader inspires people to have confidence in themselves.” Becoming a great leader isn’t easy, it requires successfully maneuvering a team through the ups and downs and the major challenges that a new business faces.
To groom yourself to be a quality business leader:
Envision yourself as a leader. You have to believe for others to believe. Recognize your best and worst qualities and evaluate them honestly. Create a plan that allows you to capitalize on your strengths. Build a team that assists you in areas that may be weaknesses, which will help you have a more well-balanced business. Be straightforward and keep it simple. The clearer your mission and direction, the stronger your team. Hire shrewdly. Nothing is more important. Do extensive research and check references. You can’t rely solely on what’s said in résumés and cover letters. It’s best to ask everyone you respect for solid candidates. Then have a trial period for the new employee before you hire.
Fire fast. If quick efforts to remediate an inadequate employee do not work, fire the person respectfully. One bad employee can infect the success of the team.
Look good. Unfortunately, we live in a shallow, beauty-obsessed society. Although leaders are not expected to have Hollywood looks necessarily, it’s worth a bit of primping to look your best at all times. You can show off your own personal style while still having a polished look.
Prioritize decisiveness over inclusiveness. The best leaders know when to encourage team involvement in decision-making and when to act unilaterally. It’s not about making friends, it’s about making the best decisions for your business.
Work long hours. I’d rather disappoint you with the truth than anesthetize you with lies.
Motivation rises and falls upon success and setbacks. Being motivated despite the challenges of business is a skill that’s required in order to sail through the storms. Tough times do not last, but tough people do. Stay motivated at the highest level.
Last but not least, when it comes to entrepreneurs, failure is an option! Every entrepreneur faces times when winds do not blow in his or her direction. Stick to your boat and keep floating. Winds always change direction. Optimism is an essential requirement for being an entrepreneur. That new direction might land you on a beautiful island you had no idea existed. Embrace setbacks and look for the opportunity to expand and grow your business.
Source: Black Enterprise

honeymag:

The dictionary describes an entrepreneur as ‘A person who engages in business enterprise, usually with some personal financial risk.’

Under this definition, anyone who runs and owns his or her own business can be classified as an entrepreneur because they are taking a risk with their finances every day. But what are the qualities of a successful entrepreneur? Simply owning a business and having risks doesn’t mean that you have successfully accomplished your goal. The dictionary only scratches the surface of what it takes to be an entrepreneur in today’s competitive business world. One must also take into account an individual’s personality, actions and behavioral patterns—which all contribute to a person’s ability to earn the title of a ‘successful entrepreneur.’

Although it may seem easy enough, becoming a successful entrepreneur is not rudimentary. You have to have a product or service that consumers really want, an organized form of sales and service, and quality marketing advertising. For many of us, the journey to earning the title begins with a burst of excitement about turning our passion into a business (followed by flashing lights of the word “success”). The experience of getting a new idea is wonderful, what follows can be the most exciting and emotional journey you will ever experience. But there is a long, hard road you must travel to take your idea from conception to reality.

I’ve been there. I traveled this road many times, I have had my share of light bulb moments, and I have learned some key points along the way that make the difference between a dreamer and a successful entrepreneur. I learned the old-fashioned way—trial and failure. But, for all my failures came a triumph that made every misstep more than worth it. Here are some helpful tips on how to avoid some of those mistakes I made, and that you take with you on your entrepreneurial adventure.

Dream big: To achieve the kind of success that you want, you need to dream big. Every success story starts with big dreams. Have a clear and concise vision of what you want and where you want your idea to go. Actively visualize success in your mind so that it actually starts to become reality. Speak it into existence! Be the person now that you imagine yourself being when you reach your goal. Dress the part now, speak the language now, talk about the places your business will allow you to travel to, research them, tell your friends and family what’s going to happen. The more you speak, the more you’ll believe and the more inclined you’ll be to make things happen. People may look at you like you’re crazy, but imagine how they looked at the Wright brother’s when they thought of creating the first successful aircraft.

Be a leader. Leadership is one of the areas that many entrepreneurs tend to overlook, according to leadership coach John C. Maxwell, whose books include The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership (Thomas Nelson, 1998) and Developing the Leader Within You (Thomas Nelson, 1993). Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “A good leader inspires people to have confidence in the leader, a great leader inspires people to have confidence in themselves.” Becoming a great leader isn’t easy, it requires successfully maneuvering a team through the ups and downs and the major challenges that a new business faces.

To groom yourself to be a quality business leader:

Envision yourself as a leader. You have to believe for others to believe.
Recognize your best and worst qualities and evaluate them honestly.
Create a plan that allows you to capitalize on your strengths.
Build a team that assists you in areas that may be weaknesses, which will help you have a more well-balanced business.
Be straightforward and keep it simple. The clearer your mission and direction, the stronger your team.
Hire shrewdly. Nothing is more important. Do extensive research and check references. You can’t rely solely on what’s said in résumés and cover letters. It’s best to ask everyone you respect for solid candidates. Then have a trial period for the new employee before you hire.

Fire fast. If quick efforts to remediate an inadequate employee do not work, fire the person respectfully. One bad employee can infect the success of the team.

Look good. Unfortunately, we live in a shallow, beauty-obsessed society. Although leaders are not expected to have Hollywood looks necessarily, it’s worth a bit of primping to look your best at all times. You can show off your own personal style while still having a polished look.

Prioritize decisiveness over inclusiveness. The best leaders know when to encourage team involvement in decision-making and when to act unilaterally. It’s not about making friends, it’s about making the best decisions for your business.

Work long hours. I’d rather disappoint you with the truth than anesthetize you with lies.

Motivation rises and falls upon success and setbacks. Being motivated despite the challenges of business is a skill that’s required in order to sail through the storms. Tough times do not last, but tough people do. Stay motivated at the highest level.

Last but not least, when it comes to entrepreneurs, failure is an option! Every entrepreneur faces times when winds do not blow in his or her direction. Stick to your boat and keep floating. Winds always change direction. Optimism is an essential requirement for being an entrepreneur. That new direction might land you on a beautiful island you had no idea existed. Embrace setbacks and look for the opportunity to expand and grow your business.

Source: Black Enterprise

Victoria Beckham Covers i-D Magazine
"Whatever The Weather" Issue
On How Her (Beckham) Style Has Evolved: When I started it was all about the corset dress. That’s what people associated me with, and possibly if I’m honest a sign of my own insecurities as well. But the older I get and the more comfortable I am in my own skin, the more I realize that to look great and feel great I haven’t always got to wear something tight.

Victoria Beckham Covers i-D Magazine

"Whatever The Weather" Issue

On How Her (Beckham) Style Has Evolved: When I started it was all about the corset dress. That’s what people associated me with, and possibly if I’m honest a sign of my own insecurities as well. But the older I get and the more comfortable I am in my own skin, the more I realize that to look great and feel great I haven’t always got to wear something tight.
NEW! on nikkistyle.net | Behind: The Beauty — Nicki’s Must-Haves!
Head on over to nikkistyle.net, HURRY! xoxo :)

NEW! on nikkistyle.net | Behind: The Beauty — Nicki’s Must-Haves!

Head on over to nikkistyle.net, HURRY! xoxo :)

honeymag:

You might already have an opinion on Yandy Smith, a new addition on the second season of VH1′s Love & Hip Hop. You might think she’s ‘messy’ or even that she’s the ‘Don King’ of the show. But you might be completely wrong.
We chatted with Yandy by phone and got to the bottom of some of the speculation on her TV reputation as an instigator, how she really feels about her cast mates and if her boyfriend really beat up Jim Jones.
With a few episodes left to go, the jury’s still out on a few things, but what we found was a woman who knows who she is and who she is not.
Yandy, you came out the Violator Management camp. Exactly how long  have you been in the industry? I got an internship with Violator in 2004, right out of college at Howard. Then I turned that into a position there.
When and where did you meet Jim Jones? I met Jim in 2005 on a private jet chartered by Russell Simmons. They were flying us to Detroit for the Hip Hop summit to register young voters and Jim and I sat next to one another. He kept telling me that he managed this group The Diplomats and I told him to hit me up if he needed any help. He started calling me every day and eventually I was like ‘You’re going to have to pay me for this.” So I became his official manager and left Violator in 2005.
On the show you’re definitely portrayed as a woman about her business. Were you always that way? Or was there a situation that brought that out of you? You know what, when I went to Howard, I got a scholarship the first two years. But my mother made me pay for the last two years. So that really taught me to be about my business. Yeah, being social was great and I did that too but I definitely learned quickly that I had to handle mine. And when school was over, I brought that same mindset to Violator Management. I knew I had to hurry up and find a job so I could pay back my student loans. So I came in on my business.
How do you determine whom you take on as a client? You know what, management is a life thing. It’s not a 9-5 thing. I’ve had Missy, Busta, whomever calling me in the middle of the night and you have to be there to be on your job. So when I look at a potential client I look for two things. First, they have to have something and it’s not always just talent. You might not think Jim is the best rapper but he’s got this hustler’s spirit that makes you want to work with him. So it’s not always about the most talented because (and this is second), I have to believe in you. If you’ve got this hustler’s drive where you’re constantly looking for a way to make money, that’s something I can believe in and if I believe in you, I’ll go hard for you.
So on the show you made the statement that at the end of the day, for you it’s about making money… See that was only part of the statement. What they didn’t show you was that I also said how much I love Jim. See a lot of that is changed in editing or manipulated by producers.
Let’s talk about that. Are you happy with the way you’ve been represented? (Groans) See, here’s the thing: most people don’t realize how this really works. If the producers contact me and say there’s a woman named Erica Mena interested in meeting with me about management, I don’t know what an Erica Mena is. But I took the meeting and all the sudden its made to look like I’m starting something. Or if Emily invites me along with the rest of the girls to her party, I don’t know what type of party it is until I get there. And really I didn’t come with Kimbella. The camera just shows us walking up to the house together, so now it looks like I’ve brought Kimbella and I didn’t.
Did you know about the Kimbella’s history with Fab before that night? No. When she told me on the show, is when I found out. And I told her, ‘you better tell Emily, especially if you’re trying to be cool, tell her before she finds out and tells you.’ But I didn’t know she would say something right there. But then all of the sudden, I’m painted to look like this instigator and I’m really not.
So have you been portrayed wrong? Listen, you can’t edit something that you do. I am who I am on the show with one exception: I really don’t have any drama in my life. I’m not around grown women fighting and all of that. That doesn’t happen in my normal life. A lot of that is manipulated because it makes sense in the storyline.
Would you consider your cast mates friends in real life? No. I’m friends with Kimbella. She is genuinely my friend. I like Somaya. I like Olivia. I knew Olivia from my Violator days. I wasn’t on her day to day team but we got to know each other better after that.
What about Chrissy? I never had a reason to be close with Chrissy. Before the show I really only had a relationship with Chrissy through Jim. If we were going somewhere and Jim was like ‘I’m bringing Chrissy’ then I was like cool. But we never hung out or had dinner at each others houses. I have that relationship with Juelz and Kim. I’m the God mother of their child.
So you’ve finished filming and I know you’ve got a big episode coming up and you can’t tell us too much. So let me ask you this, are you at peace with how the situation ended with you and Jim? I’m at peace. Absolutely. You know what? The show brought a lot of things to light. I’m quick to brother out somebody. I’m super quick to call a dude my brother – and part of that comes from being a woman in this industry. Calling someone my brother lets other people know there’s nothing going on and it sends a message to that dude that there’s a line he shouldn’t cross with me. But Jim? Jim was deeper than my brother. In a lot of ways I think of Jim as my first born. He really was my very first project. We were broke together and then got reach together.
So where is that relationship now? I will always love Mama Jones. Mama Jones and I used to talk for hours about all sorts of things – not just Jim – so I will always have a relationship with her.
What about Jim? I’ll just say this: Jim will always be a very important factor in my career history. Like I said, he was there in the beginning, so my appreciation for that will always be there.
You said the show brought some things to light, do you regret doing it? See, I’m on the fence about that. Every time I meet a young girl and she tells me how much they admire me for being a strong black woman about my business, I’m super grateful for the opportunity to show that to them. I built myself up, without having to be someone’s wife or girlfriend. So that’s when I’m glad I did the show. But then when I see the comments about how I’m always starting something, I realize a lot of people don’t get it. They think all of it is real. And then that’s what makes me think twice about my participation.
So if they asked you back for Season 3, would you do it? I don’t know at this point. Honestly. The people that can really affect my bottom line, know what it is. But the other people that see the show and call me the Don King of the show, they think ‘oh Yandy’s messy.’ I don’t know if there’s anywhere else for me to go on the show. And I don’t need my own show. America likes to watch a train wreck. Chrissy could have her own show. But I’m not a train wreck. So I don’t know.
There was a rumor that your boyfriend beat Jim up?  Who said I have a boyfriend?
I’ve done my homework.  Well depending on where you did your homework, you might’ve gotten that I’m a lesbian, or that I’m involved with a married man who paid for my college degree…So I’m just wondering.
Do you have a boyfriend? (Laughs) Yes, I have a boo.
Did he beat up Jim Jones? I don’t know. I wasn’t there. I heard Jim say it was a botched robbery in Harlem.
Did your boyfriend attempt to rob Jim Jones, in Harlem? No. My boyfriend definitely doesn’t need to rob anyone.

honeymag:

You might already have an opinion on Yandy Smith, a new addition on the second season of VH1′s Love & Hip Hop. You might think she’s ‘messy’ or even that she’s the ‘Don King’ of the show. But you might be completely wrong.

We chatted with Yandy by phone and got to the bottom of some of the speculation on her TV reputation as an instigator, how she really feels about her cast mates and if her boyfriend really beat up Jim Jones.

With a few episodes left to go, the jury’s still out on a few things, but what we found was a woman who knows who she is and who she is not.

Yandy, you came out the Violator Management camp. Exactly how long have you been in the industry?
I got an internship with Violator in 2004, right out of college at Howard. Then I turned that into a position there.

When and where did you meet Jim Jones?
I met Jim in 2005 on a private jet chartered by Russell Simmons. They were flying us to Detroit for the Hip Hop summit to register young voters and Jim and I sat next to one another. He kept telling me that he managed this group The Diplomats and I told him to hit me up if he needed any help. He started calling me every day and eventually I was like ‘You’re going to have to pay me for this.” So I became his official manager and left Violator in 2005.

On the show you’re definitely portrayed as a woman about her business. Were you always that way? Or was there a situation that brought that out of you?
You know what, when I went to Howard, I got a scholarship the first two years. But my mother made me pay for the last two years. So that really taught me to be about my business. Yeah, being social was great and I did that too but I definitely learned quickly that I had to handle mine. And when school was over, I brought that same mindset to Violator Management. I knew I had to hurry up and find a job so I could pay back my student loans. So I came in on my business.

How do you determine whom you take on as a client?
You know what, management is a life thing. It’s not a 9-5 thing. I’ve had Missy, Busta, whomever calling me in the middle of the night and you have to be there to be on your job. So when I look at a potential client I look for two things. First, they have to have something and it’s not always just talent. You might not think Jim is the best rapper but he’s got this hustler’s spirit that makes you want to work with him. So it’s not always about the most talented because (and this is second), I have to believe in you. If you’ve got this hustler’s drive where you’re constantly looking for a way to make money, that’s something I can believe in and if I believe in you, I’ll go hard for you.

So on the show you made the statement that at the end of the day, for you it’s about making money…
See that was only part of the statement. What they didn’t show you was that I also said how much I love Jim. See a lot of that is changed in editing or manipulated by producers.

Let’s talk about that. Are you happy with the way you’ve been represented?
(Groans) See, here’s the thing: most people don’t realize how this really works. If the producers contact me and say there’s a woman named Erica Mena interested in meeting with me about management, I don’t know what an Erica Mena is. But I took the meeting and all the sudden its made to look like I’m starting something. Or if Emily invites me along with the rest of the girls to her party, I don’t know what type of party it is until I get there. And really I didn’t come with Kimbella. The camera just shows us walking up to the house together, so now it looks like I’ve brought Kimbella and I didn’t.

Did you know about the Kimbella’s history with Fab before that night?
No. When she told me on the show, is when I found out. And I told her, ‘you better tell Emily, especially if you’re trying to be cool, tell her before she finds out and tells you.’ But I didn’t know she would say something right there. But then all of the sudden, I’m painted to look like this instigator and I’m really not.

So have you been portrayed wrong?
Listen, you can’t edit something that you do. I am who I am on the show with one exception: I really don’t have any drama in my life. I’m not around grown women fighting and all of that. That doesn’t happen in my normal life. A lot of that is manipulated because it makes sense in the storyline.

Would you consider your cast mates friends in real life?
No. I’m friends with Kimbella. She is genuinely my friend. I like Somaya. I like Olivia. I knew Olivia from my Violator days. I wasn’t on her day to day team but we got to know each other better after that.

What about Chrissy?
I never had a reason to be close with Chrissy. Before the show I really only had a relationship with Chrissy through Jim. If we were going somewhere and Jim was like ‘I’m bringing Chrissy’ then I was like cool. But we never hung out or had dinner at each others houses. I have that relationship with Juelz and Kim. I’m the God mother of their child.

So you’ve finished filming and I know you’ve got a big episode coming up and you can’t tell us too much. So let me ask you this, are you at peace with how the situation ended with you and Jim?
I’m at peace. Absolutely. You know what? The show brought a lot of things to light. I’m quick to brother out somebody. I’m super quick to call a dude my brother – and part of that comes from being a woman in this industry. Calling someone my brother lets other people know there’s nothing going on and it sends a message to that dude that there’s a line he shouldn’t cross with me. But Jim? Jim was deeper than my brother. In a lot of ways I think of Jim as my first born. He really was my very first project. We were broke together and then got reach together.

So where is that relationship now?
I will always love Mama Jones. Mama Jones and I used to talk for hours about all sorts of things – not just Jim – so I will always have a relationship with her.

What about Jim?
I’ll just say this: Jim will always be a very important factor in my career history. Like I said, he was there in the beginning, so my appreciation for that will always be there.

You said the show brought some things to light, do you regret doing it?
See, I’m on the fence about that. Every time I meet a young girl and she tells me how much they admire me for being a strong black woman about my business, I’m super grateful for the opportunity to show that to them. I built myself up, without having to be someone’s wife or girlfriend. So that’s when I’m glad I did the show. But then when I see the comments about how I’m always starting something, I realize a lot of people don’t get it. They think all of it is real. And then that’s what makes me think twice about my participation.

So if they asked you back for Season 3, would you do it?
I don’t know at this point. Honestly. The people that can really affect my bottom line, know what it is. But the other people that see the show and call me the Don King of the show, they think ‘oh Yandy’s messy.’ I don’t know if there’s anywhere else for me to go on the show. And I don’t need my own show. America likes to watch a train wreck. Chrissy could have her own show. But I’m not a train wreck. So I don’t know.

There was a rumor that your boyfriend beat Jim up?
Who said I have a boyfriend?

I’ve done my homework.
Well depending on where you did your homework, you might’ve gotten that I’m a lesbian, or that I’m involved with a married man who paid for my college degree…So I’m just wondering.

Do you have a boyfriend?
(Laughs) Yes, I have a boo.

Did he beat up Jim Jones?
I don’t know. I wasn’t there. I heard Jim say it was a botched robbery in Harlem.

Did your boyfriend attempt to rob Jim Jones, in Harlem?
No. My boyfriend definitely doesn’t need to rob anyone.

JUST IN — Taliah (of Fashion Was Here) chats w/me about personal style. Do you want to be inspired? Click here to read more, or visit nikkistyle.net.

JUST IN — Taliah (of Fashion Was Here) chats w/me about personal style. Do you want to be inspired? Click here to read more, or visit nikkistyle.net.

honeymag:

Its not a rumor any longer… Stacey Dash will not be returning for the second season of VH1′s hit show ‘Single Ladies’ she and the network have both confirmed.
Stacey released this statement herself:
“I truly enjoyed playing Val on ‘Single Ladies’, but I have decided to leave the show. I have to be back in L.A. with my children right now and the ‘Single Ladies’ shooting location makes that impossible. I wish VH1 the best of luck with the show and in maintaining the strong fan base we developed in season one.”
She definitely did not feed into the rumors of her being a difficult person to work with (aka b.i.t.c.h) on set, did she? Lol…
The network on the otherhand had this to say:
“VH1 respects Stacey’s decision and her commitment to what she feels is best for her family. We thank her for all of her hard work in making ‘Single Ladies’ a success right out of the gate, and we wish her nothing but the best in her future plans.”
Ha… So, who else believes this excuse??
Source: the ybf

honeymag:

Its not a rumor any longer… Stacey Dash will not be returning for the second season of VH1′s hit show ‘Single Ladies’ she and the network have both confirmed.

Stacey released this statement herself:

“I truly enjoyed playing Val on ‘Single Ladies’, but I have decided to leave the show. I have to be back in L.A. with my children right now and the ‘Single Ladies’ shooting location makes that impossible. I wish VH1 the best of luck with the show and in maintaining the strong fan base we developed in season one.”

She definitely did not feed into the rumors of her being a difficult person to work with (aka b.i.t.c.h) on set, did she? Lol…

The network on the otherhand had this to say:

“VH1 respects Stacey’s decision and her commitment to what she feels is best for her family. We thank her for all of her hard work in making ‘Single Ladies’ a success right out of the gate, and we wish her nothing but the best in her future plans.”

Ha… So, who else believes this excuse??

Source: the ybf

JWoww isn’t even Italian? “My dad is Irish and my mom’s Spanish…”